Reading Summary for May 2017

May seems to have sped by like a runaway train, and I can’t believe that I’m already doing another monthly reading summary. This month seems to have been all about what is somewhat annoyingly described as ‘self-care’, which brings to mind a candle-lit bath and a warm cocoon of a towel. In my case, however, it means reading books in which I can lose myself, preferably without crying.

A rather productive reading month, 15 books read (one of them a re-read), only one turkey, and quite a few winners. 9 books by women writers, 6 by men, 5 in translation.

Mood boosters

Matt Haig: The Humans

Funny, humane, instantly recognisable and imaginative. Reminded me in parts of The Man Who Fell to Earth, except it shows more love for humans in spite of all of our flaws. Some moments had me laughing out loud, while others are almost in danger of descending into sentimentality. But, as the author says,
‘Sentimentality is another human flaw. A distortion. Another twisted by-product of love, serving no rational purpose. And yet, there was a force behind it as authentic as any other.’ Perfect mood-boosting book for all who have felt a little out of step with life and the others.

Muriel Spark: A Far Cry from Kensington

Rereading this zany look into the world of publishing, with all of Spark’s trademark humour, precise wording, wit, and just a tinge of cruelty.

Vivienne Tufnell: Away with the Fairies 

Pantheistic approach to nature, life, creation and love.

Jane Gardam: The Stories

Elegant, witty yet very empathetic account of marginalised, ignored, insignificant little people. Some may be annoying, some inspire pity or sadness, but all are presented with a lot of heart.

Elizabeth Jane Howard: The Light Years

Searched for this at the library after reading Sarah Perry’s loving tribute to the Cazalet series in the Foxed Quarterly. I knew I had read one or two of the books, out of order, but couldn’t remember which ones or much else, so I started at the beginning. Perfect comfort reading for these turbulent times, although it actually depicts a Britain with odd similarities to the present-day, just before WW2, considerable uncertainty and fear, conflicting attitudes towards war and Hitler. All the little details of life are here, with recognisable concerns and characters, even though the main characters are all rich and privileged, have servants and seemingly endless baths and meals.

Crime busters

Andrée Michaud: Boundary

Susie Steiner: Persons Unknown

Tina Seskis: The Honeymoon

Matt Wesolowski: Six Stories

Antti Tuomainen: The Mine

Perfectly captures the chilly beauty and sinister quality of the Finnish winter. This book pushes the boundaries of a conventional thriller – yes, we have a hitman and quite a few murders along the way, we have a conspiracy about a mining project which has gone wrong, but it is really about family, having principles and values, feeling conflicted between finding out the truth and protecting your loved ones. Fully realised characters and an unobtrusive, limpid, muscular storytelling style (without ever being garishly macho, like in most action thrillers).

Clever Observation in Prime Location

Delia Ephron: Siracusa

All the pretentiousness of rich Americans and Brooklynites abroad mercilessly exposed in this tale of marital break-down, selfish adults and abundant self-delusions. Review to appear shortly on Shiny New Books.

Sarah Stovell: Exquisite

Not so much a psychological thriller, as a carefully orchestrated duet and a welcome respite from the relentless insistence on implausible twists for the sake of twists in recent books. From my review on Crime Fiction Lover:

‘The fun of the book lies in the inevitable downward spiral into obsession, jealousy and revenge. You might be tempted to read Exquisite quickly, breathlessly, but I would advise you to take your time and savour the journey. The author is completely in control of pace and characters, like a fine piano tuner able to make the most minute adjustments to the tension in each string, each chapter, each interaction. Allow yourself to be played. Enjoy the music.’

Andrzej Stasiuk: On the Road to Babadag

Wolfgang Herrndorf: Sand

Bogdan Teodorescu: Spada

When I heard that this was about a serial killer targeting criminals of gypsy origins in Romania, I expected it to be a police procedural with some political echoes. In fact, it is an unusual political thriller which examines how inflammatory rhetoric, extremist discourse and racial hatred are peddled by politicians for their own purposes and the devastating consequences it can have. Highly relevant for our times, not just in Romania.

 

 

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24 thoughts on “Reading Summary for May 2017”

  1. An interesting selection of books this month! And I know what you mean about hiding in them – I alternative with shouting at co-workers to try and bully them into not voting for That Woman with hiding inside the cover of a book and trying not to get upset about it….

    1. I work from home (or else run training courses, when I’m not allowed to rant), so the only people who get to hear my hot political views are my sons and … Twitter. I’ll probably lose all my followers. Plus I feel like Trump… heaven forbid!

  2. A good reading month! I am definitely feeling like getting lost in books lately. Things make more sense there even if they are falling to pieces.

    1. I’ve got that tune ‘It’s end of the world as we know it’ stuck in my head and it’s making me insanely cheerful. Must be losing my marbles!

  3. A good mixed reading month from the sound of it – even grim and dark books can feel like a nice little break from reality these days! I think my pick of these would be either The Mine or Six Stories…

  4. I come here to read and learn and what happens? More books on the impossible TBR lists. Several books sound good to me, especially Spada. And you answered my question about whether it’s in English translation. I’ll hope and wait for it.
    Glad you had a good reading month. I wish I could read with a lovely cat at my feet.

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