Another Little Book Splurge

Repeat after me: summertime, and the living is easy… And, if it is not, we like to pretend it is. What better way to do so than with some new books? All recommended by online or writing friends.

  1. After rereading Persuasion, Janet Emson decided to give Mansfield Park another go, which made me want to reread all the Austen novels, as I used to do once a year in my so-called less busy 20s (when I was juggling three jobs at at a time). So the perfect excuse to acquire these pretty new Vintage Classics editions of my two least favourite Jane Austen novels, Sense and Sensibility and Mansfield Park. (I still like them a lot and these editions will make me like them more.)
  2. Rebecca Watts: The Met Office Advises Caution grabbed my attention on Kaggsy’s blog. A debut collection of poetry which combines observations of nature, wit, science and human drama.
  3. Meena Kandasamy: When I Hit You or, A Portrait of the Writer as a Young Wife caught my eye in this smart review, A List of People Who Should Read this book. I want to learn more about present-day India and anything about the struggle between marriage and art is bound to attract me…
  4. Rae Armantrout: Entanglements is a tiny volume of poetry, but it’s apparently described as making poetry of physics. I did at one point want to study physics and most of my physicist friends (other than my husband) are also very fond of poetry. There seems to be a hidden connection there (as with maths and music). Furthermore, at our poetry masterclass, Laura Kasischke said that my poetry reminded her of Rae Armantrout’s (whom I have never read).
  5. Charles Forsdick & Christian Hogsbjerg: Toussaint Louverture – A Black Jacobin in the Age of Revolutions. This book was mentioned on the Repeating Islands website, which focuses on Caribbean art, culture, history and literature. The Haitian slave who became a military leader and governor, led the only successful slave revolt in history and founded the first free colonial society which explicitly rejected race as the basis of social ranking is a fascinating character. I had heard of him from my Haitian salsa teacher in France. After a year or two of having mainly girls as a partner, I gave up on salsa but I was impressed by the dancing skills and revolutionary spirit of my teacher (although he was less impressed with Voltaire than me).
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19 thoughts on “Another Little Book Splurge”

      1. Yes, I feel I will see her differently now. I liked Emma Wodehouse so much more on my second reading. So I bought a gorgeous new clothbound edition of MP and I still haven’t read it.

  1. A nice pile of books – happy to be a bad influence and I hope you enjoy the Watts! I really must re-read some Austen this summer – I have a nice edition of Persuasion which would do the trick! 🙂

  2. A little indulgence now and again is good for the soul. One day I’ll find the time to re-read all of Austen too -she always rewards a re-read I find.

  3. When I think about book buying, I have a new way to cut the guilt.
    Do you know how much a good bike costs for people who love cycling and have it as their main hobby? Something like 3000 euros, the equivalent of 300 paperbacks.

    So, is reading is such an expensive hobby?

    You can try to convert the cost of golf equipment into paperbacks, I’m sure you’ll feel better too.

    Cheers!

    1. I like your thinking! I don’t play golf, I don’t have expensive bikes, I don’t even go to expensive restaurants, so yes, my book buying is ENTIRELY justified and much more generous (after all, everyone can read them in my house).

  4. I love that idea of comparing book buying to other hobbies, my partner has three bikes although I suspect the combined cost of all my books is still probably more than them! Books however last a lifetime.

    1. Ha, ha, exactly! Although I suspect my ex-husband would say that his bikes have lasted a lifetime, as he is still planning to repair his rusty racing bike at some point… But he also spent a fortune on gadgets, so to each their own!

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