Week in Review with a Book Haul

Honestly, sincerely, believe me I meant it… when I said I would start digging into my TBR pile and stop buying books this year. But accidents do happen! And this is how my week panned out…

First of all, I realised that it has been weeks since I last saw my Kindle. I have searched for it everywhere but cannot locate it. So this means no more acquisitions via Netgalley, but also no more reading of the long, long list of books I have there, including some rather pressing reviews. I would buy a new one, but I am fairly sure that the instant I order it, the old one will resurface from some cavernous depth of my house (I don’t often take it out unless I am travelling, and I have already searched my suitcase).

Secondly, I have enjoyed reviewing my first Asymptote Book Club read, Cesar Aira. A new author to me, but I enjoyed him so much that I read two other novellas by him in quick succession. He is remarkably prolific, so he might be a bit hit and miss, but so far I really like him.

Thirdly, I had a busy week at work, but it was creative, strategic work which I enjoyed, made all the better by listening to Hamilton, which I now have uploaded onto my laptop. Initially I loved all the big, obvious songs like My Shot or The Room Where It Happens, but now I am more drawn to Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Story and the optimism of The Story of Tonight. ‘Raise a glass to the four of us, tomorrow there will be more of us.’

Finally, yes, OK, I admit I did get some new books this week. What?! You expect me to pile ashes on my head and put the hair shirt on? I only bought three, of which two were second-hand, and I received two more for review.

Alison Lurie: Women and Ghosts

Collection of short stories, sometimes comic, sometimes, haunting, where people’s lives are disrupted by supernatural occurrences. Not normally a fan of ghost stories, but I know that Lurie is such a keen observer of human foibles, so I think this could be good.

Jodie Hollander: My Dark Horses

A debut poetry collection that traces the troubled relationship of the poet with her mother, as well as the charms and vicissitudes of growing up in a family of obsessive musicians. I have to admit to a selfish reason for ordering this one via Waterstones: it was recommended to me by a fellow poet after she read my poems about my mother.

Nice cover, but isn’t that dress from post WW2?

Paula McLain: The Paris Wife

I’ve been meaning to read this forever, ever since it came out in 2010. I really enjoyed Hemingway’s Moveable Feast, with its portrait of bohemian expat artist life in Paris in the 1920s, but that is just Hemingway’s side of the story. And, as we all know, he wasn’t really good to the women in his life.

 

Thomas Enger: Killed

Orenda Books shares my passion for Norway and has kindly sent me the dark, suspenseful finale of this series about crime reporter Henning Juul.

Kate Rhodes: Hell Bay

This is the start of a new series by Kate Rhodes, set on the Scilly Islands (which I now want to visit). I read a sample of it after going to the Simon & Schuster launch evening last year and have been eagerly awaiting the rest of the story ever since.

21 thoughts on “Week in Review with a Book Haul”

  1. Well, honestly, Marina Sofia, it was just a few books. Where’s the harm? I see no problem with it at all. And that Enger and the Rhodes do look good; I hope you’ll enjoy them. I hope you find your Kindle, too!

  2. I hope your Kindle turns up soon. It’s a pain when they get lost somewhere – I have the kindle app on my phone so that I can keep reading for a while if my kindle disappears but it’s not ideal reading on a screen. The new books you got this week all sound good. I haven’t read anything by Alison Lurie for a long while but you’ve made me want to seek out her books again. I hope you enjoy reading the books you got and that you have a good week ahead.
    Here’s my weekly wrap-up: https://rathertoofondofbooks.com/2018/01/14/my-weekly-wrap-up-14-jan/

  3. I read The Paris Wife some time ago after A Moveable Feast – one of the first titles I posted about, if I remember rightly. Interesting to see the less attractive aspects of Hemingway portrayed by Paula M in contrast to the self portrait H gives…

  4. Women and Ghosts is among my favorite short story collection, so you’re totally forgiven! The Paris Wife is at my workplace library, and I’m thinking that it would be a fun parallel reading with A Moveable Feast, which I haven’t read even after the terrorists attacks that put it on the forefront again.

    1. Ah, you have to read the two for their description of Paris (through the heated imagination of creative Americans). And so glad to hear you recommend the Alison Lurie collection. You got me started on her!

  5. I’m so tempted by the new Kate Rhodes but I’m still pretending I’m going to stick to my New Year’s resoultions, so every acquisition has to be carefully planned… *smugly superior smiley* 😉

  6. Yay for ‘accidents’ and sorry to hear about your Kindle. I have heard a lot (both good and bad) about The Paris Wife and I can’t wait to hear what you think.

  7. Oh the Lurie sounds interesting. I was – mixed – about The Paris Wife. I thought I’d lost my Kindle to a water bottle yesterday, but it seems to have survived. Phew. (Memo to self, – do check water bottle lid is screwed on tight and water bottle is placed in back pack the right way up in future) It took me a while to understand why, wherever I was walking, the floor seemed to be wet…….

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