Strawberry Hill Forever!

I had the great good fortune of visiting St Mary’s University in Twickenham on a sunny day, which allowed me to take a walk through its lovely campus and visit its next-door neighbour Strawberry Hill House: indeed, there is a door leading from the wing of one to the old building of the other.

St Mary’s University leading to Strawberry Hill House (in white).

It was the summer house built to house the art collection of the extravagant and eccentric Horace Walpole, politician, art historian and writer. He was not all that rich when he acquired a plot of land with a cottage and a nice view over the River Thames in Twickenham, but he had very strong ideas about what he wanted to create: an architectural folly to entertain guests who would come upstream to visit him, a backdrop for his legendary literary and artistic parties.

Period view of Strawberry Hill House by E. Sandby.

He had a passion for the Gothic style and pioneered its revival a good half century or more before the Victorian revival of it. He even pioneered it in literature, starting a new genre: the Gothic horror with The Castle of Otranto. As he got richer, he kept adding another wing or redecorating the house, and of course he spent a fortune on his collections. Not just objects of artistic value but also of historical importance – for example, the clock that Henry VIII gave to Anne Boleyn on their wedding day or Cardinal Wolsey’s scarlet cardinal hat. Before visiting, I had the impression that Walpole made it up as he went along and created a mish-mash of styles without much thought and planning. But I discovered just how meticulous a historian he was and how accurate all his reproductions were (of wallpaper and silk hangings for example).

The oldest part of the house was a sort of two up two down cottage, and Walpole added a wooden turret to it.

And it was not all about extravagance. He was also astute at spotting a bargain – for instance, most of the stained glass in the windows was reclaimed from Flemish salvage yards. Unlike most private collectors, he was not about keeping it all for himself, but saw Strawberry Hill as a cultural centre to be shared with others. He started a printing press, and exhibited most of his possessions like a museum.

He had a wonderful life surrounded by all his favourite objects, showing them off to visitors, living exactly as he pleased. But the sad coda to this tale is that when he died without an heir, his entire collection was auctioned off. Fortunately, for a short time only, much of it has been brought together again (on loan or reproduced) and until the 24th of February you can see Strawberry Hill as its owner wanted it to be seen in the Lost Treasures exhibition.

You’re not allowed to take pictures inside, but I have to show you the promotional picture of the library, which can be hired as a wedding venue, I believe.

The view over the Thames has been lost, sadly, and the gardens border onto St Mary’s athletic track, but what other garden has got a shell-shaped seat with a whole book dedicated to it?

10 thoughts on “Strawberry Hill Forever!”

  1. Thank you so much for sharing! Didn’t Jane Austen write a parody of Walpole’s Gothic thriller? I looked on my shelves for her book, to check, but they are all jumbled–would rather read than sort them out.

    1. According to one of the very knowledgeable and passionate guides there, all of his books were auctioned off after his death and, because he didn’t keep an exact list, there is no way of knowing exactly what was on his bookshelves. So they’ve bought leather-bound copies of the most likely 18th century books, as well as ‘books by the yard’ that looked the part.

  2. What a lovely day you had! Thanks for sharing, Marina Sofia. And oh! that library! Who wouldn’t absolutely die for it? Thanks for sharing those ‘photos.

  3. I’m not sure it would be wise to let a booklover get married in a library – the bridegroom might get a bit annoyed if the bride popped off halfway through the vows to do a bit of browsing…

  4. Lovely! I read The Castle of Otranto just after Northanger Abbey. I went on a Gothic reading binge round that time.

  5. What a great visit it must have been.

    I don’t know where the thought comes from but I think his name goes well with his property.

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