WWWednesday 16 October 2019

It’s been a long time since I participated in this weekly meme, hosted by Sam at Taking on a World of Words

The three Ws are:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish reading?
  • What do you think you’ll read next?

Currently reading:

Will Carver: Nothing Important Happened Today – A dark thriller about suicide pacts of people who belong to a cult – even if they don’t know they do. I studied so-called cults for my Ph.D; it’s a term that I really objecto to, because, as the author quotes right at the start of the book: ‘Nobody joins a cult. Nobody joins something they think is going to hurt them. You join a religious organsiation, you join a political movement, and you join with people that you really like.’ For #Orentober reading with Orenda Books.

Sébastien Meier: Le Nom du père (The Name of the Father) – To continue with my Swiss in October reading, another francophone Swiss writer, despite his Germanic sounding name, with a psychological thriller.

Always in the background: Uwe Johnson’s Anniversaries (the German edition) – trying to read one entry per day, although it usually ends up being 4 days’ worth of entries in one day and then a break.

Just finished:

Alex Capus: Almost Like Spring – part of my Swiss in October reading. The story of the two most notorious bank robbers in Basel or perhaps the whole of Switzerland. I had no idea this was based on a true story and was about to give it brownie points for the stylistic innovation of making it sound like it’s a documentary, with quotes from eyewitnesses and people reminiscing after the event.

Camil Petrescu for the #1930Club

Reading next:

Nicola Barker: The Cauliflower – From one guru to another; and finally a woman writer after a very male-centred week of reading.

China Mieville: Embassytown – because I think it might be a nice counterpoint to the Meier novel, with crime fiction as a pretext for uncovering so much more.

Looking ahead at November, because some of my blogger friends so kindly reminded me that it will be German Literature Month, I have the following possibilities in mind:

9 thoughts on “WWWednesday 16 October 2019”

  1. You have some fine books there, Marina Sofia. And you make some important points about the word ‘cult.’ Incidentally, one of the finalist books for the Ngaio Marsh Award for Best Book last year was Charity Norman’s See You in September,/i>, which deals with the story of a young woman who joins a group of people who live on a sustainable commune. It turns out that the group is what many people would call a cult, but it’s interesting to see her perspective as she joins. One of the issues that runs through the book is how and why people join such groups.

    1. Look forward to seeing what you find for German Lit month. And I suddenly got a craving for Mieville when someone mentioned another science fiction novel or premise…

  2. I read some good books lately: Such a Pretty Girl, a fantastic memoir by disability rights leader, Nadina LaSpina, originally from Sicily, now in New York; City of Girls, a delightful book going back to the WWII years in NYC and the adventures of a young woman who was a costume designer; Dachshund through the Snow, by David Rosenfelt, a fun, witty, legal mystery (a go to when need stress relief), Am now reading Nothing Stays Buried, by P.J. Tracy. Will get two books from the library: Patsy, by Nicole Dennis-Benn and This Poison Will Remain, by Fred Vargas. I like to keep two books going: one a more serious mystery or nonmystery novel and a light mystery or other novel. Or a memoir.

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