#6Degrees of Separation: August 2020

Welcome to August 2020 edition of Six Degrees of Separation! This is a monthly link-up hosted by Kate at Books Are My Favourite and Best. Each month a book is chosen as a starting point and linked to six other books to form a chain. The fun lies in seeing what quirky connections readers can come up with, although it’s by no means a competition!

This month’s starting point is How to Do Nothing by Jenny Odell, which I’ve vaguely heard about and which sounds really interesting. It’s all about escaping from the constant demands on our attention in the 24/7 news cycle and social media saturated world we live in. I certainly feel I am spending far too much time on Twitter, the drug of my choice! However, from what I can tell, it’s not so much a self-help book as an anti-capitalism book.

Another anti-capitalism book from a globalised perspective is Capitalism. A Ghost Story by Arundhati Roy, which looks at how multinationals have taken over from the British Empire in exploiting the natural resources and the people of India, and how they have started to infiltrate policy-making and government through their powerful lobbying groups.

Arundhati Roy is of course better known as a novelist, and another novelist who was also a political activist was Nadine Gordimer. Perhaps her most politically explicit novel was July’s People, in which she imagines a bloody civil war putting an end to apartheid in her native South Africa.

Nadine Gordimer won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1991, so for my next connection, I choose another Nobel Prize winner from the Southern hemisphere (and incidentally, another politically engaged writer) Pablo Neruda from Chile. His love sonnets were indispensable reading (and quoting) for lovesick teenagers when I was in secondary school.

Another poet I revered in my teens – and who is in fact the ideal moody teen idol for those who would like to rebel but are too nice to do so – is Arthur Rimbaud, especially his A Season in Hell, in which he quite explicitly threatens to abandon poetry, which he did too all too soon, at the tender age of 21.

Speaking of precocious writers, the next link is to Daisy Ashford’s The Visiters, written at the age of nine (and published with all the spelling mistakes intact). Although she continued writing for a short while in her teens, but she stopped once the First World War broke out and afterwards when she got married and had children.

I’ve walked myself into a corner here, as I don’t want to focus on yet another precocious author, so instead I’ll try to find one with a similar title: The Visitor by Irish writer Maeve Brennan. The author was known primarily as a short story writer, but after her death the typescript of this short novel written in her 20s was discovered, and really confirms her exceptional (and very dark) talent.

As usual, I’ve been a bit of a globetrotter in my links and travelled this month to India, South Africa, Chile, France, England and Ireland. Where will your 6 Degrees take you?

11 thoughts on “#6Degrees of Separation: August 2020”

  1. Very glad to see Pablo Neruda in your chain this week, Marina Sofia. I always loved his poetry. And it’s interesting how politics is woven through your choices this time. I think there’s political commentary in a lot of books, even those that do so unintentionally.

  2. Wow… some really great links here… I’ve decided that if I get stuck, I’m going to look to see if I can find the next book according to the cover of the one I just picked! Works also if you have too many choices, too!

  3. What a wonderful post, and all excellent choices, I’m loving how you make the transitions between them! Thank you.

  4. Great chain, and I’ve actually read one of them this month – The Visitor, which I loved. Nadine Gordimer has been on my must-read-someday radar for years – really must do something about that…

  5. You have definitely been a globetrotter here! And here I am, straight from South Africa to say hi to you!

    Lovely selection you have and I think your chain is very clever. Here’s my 6 Degrees of separation

    1. Welcome on board – may I just say that I love South Africa? I went there a couple of times, mostly business trips, but I am planning to go and stay there for longer at some point.

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