Friday Fun: City vs. Country

There are contrasts between the urban and rural in any country, but I sometimes think that Romania is an extreme example of that. No wonder I am dazed when I go back there for any period of time!

The Museum of Romanian Literature is housed in a former noble townhouse in Bucharest.
My grandmother’s house has been repainted, the vine replanted, but you can still see the porch where we used to sleep in summer, because it was too hot indoors.
Architectural detail on Calea Victoriei, Bucharest.
Interior delight at my grandmother’s house in the countryside. We loved the stove, which was used both for cooking and for heating in winter. The ubiquitous Abduction from the Seraglio wall hanging (barely glimpsed on the left) was less popular with us children…
Charming room over the carriage entrance at a grand house in Bucharest.
Although my grandparents’ house had two rooms, one was kept pristine ‘The Good Room’ for guests, while the parents and seven children all crowded in two beds in this room. My father, the youngest of seven children, says that they slept horizontally across the bed, with their feet either dangling or propped up on chairs.
The best restaurant in Bucharest at the moment, or so I hear.
During the summer months, my grandmother used this summer kitchen next to the main house, with a vegetable and herb garden right next to it, and grapevines hanging over a trellis (no longer there) while we played cards at the table – and occasionally helped her.
The Bucharest villa of pianist Dinu Lipatti, lit up in Ukrainian colours.
One of the three cemeteries where family members lie buried in the countryside.
There isn’t much love for modernist architecture, but this 1930s building designed for a ministry deserves to be renovated.
Museum of Art Collections was one of my favourite places to visit while at school, with frequent talks about art and culture from other countries.

13 thoughts on “Friday Fun: City vs. Country”

  1. You’re right, Marina Sofia – those are some sharp contrasts between country and city! I have to say, I’m not sure I’d want to share a bed with that many other people, though! Still, I loved the memories and stories you shared – thanks!

    1. Luckily, the oldest sister got married and left the house when my father (the youngest) was seven, and another got married soon after. So the bed occupancy rate did go down eventually (but their size got bigger too, I suppose).

  2. I found those photos and commentary very interesting. Thank you.
    I did find it amazing that they would leave one room unused and sleep in such a cramped situation!
    Made me think of my mother telling me the reason she got married at age 18 was to escape sleeping in bed with her 4 sisters, in a tenement in New York City. The marriage lasted 67 years, by the way!

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