The Candidate

On the next page the ink turns green

Fresh shoots, new hope, all that palaver

You examine the manuscript under a loop of magnified manifold

You process pleasure in Powerpoint bullets

Tarnish templates with monotype ghosting

It’s all done with robots now but you like to muck in

No parchment too precious for fingers to wander

You meter their words, box in statements of intent.

There is such a thing as perfect length or outstaying welcomes

There is no such thing as the perfect applicant.

 

Upcoming Releases from Simon and Schuster

As a reviewer for Crime Fiction Lover, I had the good fortune to be invited to Simon & Schuster’s Crime Showcase 2017 in London last Wednesday. It was an evening dedicated to their recent or forthcoming crime fiction releases and there were quite a few authors and titles to get excited about. (And no, I was neither forced nor bribed to write about the evening and do their marketing for them, but I thought there might be something of interest here for other crime fans.)

Chris Carter doesn’t require much of an introduction: he has been using his background as a criminal psychologist to delight and horrify readers in equal measure with his compulsive but disturbing novels about serial killers and psychopaths since 2009. His latest novel to feature LAPD Detectives Robert Hunter and Carlos Garcia is The Callerin which once again our present-day love of technology and social media is used to chilling effect by the murderer.

Craig Robertson is likewise a writer known well beyond the realms of his native Scotland. In his latest book in the Narey & Winter series Murderabilia, he explores the macabre practice of collecting items from crime scenes and selling them on the dark web for collectors. If this isn’t enough to put you off the internet, I don’t know what is.

Craig Robertson and Chris Carter reading each other’s books.

But it’s not all about the latest in an established series. I was rather intrigued to discover that three authors are turning their hand to a new series. Once upon a time, Luca Veste was a fellow contributor to Crime Fiction Lover, but his career as a writer has gone from success to success. His latest The Bone Keeper (out in Nov. 2017) still takes place in his native Liverpool, but it introduces new police investigator DC Louise Henderson, as well as an urban myth made flesh.

Meanwhile, Kate Rhodes (whom I tipped for great things as a ‘Woman Writer to Watch‘ in 2013) is setting her new series in the Scilly Isles and features a male investigator DI Ben Kitto, recently returned to the island from his London stomping ground. I started reading the sample pages on the train home and was utterly captivated. I can’t wait for this to come out – although I will have to be patient until January 2018.

Chris Petit wrote several thrillers in the late 1990s, but had focused more on film-making in the past few years. He is now back in writing mode, with a dark historical crime novel set in wartime Berlin. The Butchers of Berlin introduces us to August Schlegel, who normally works in financial crimes, but for some reason finds himself called out on a homicide case.

Although the emphasis is on home-grown crime, S&S has prepared some translated fiction for us too. Sandrone Dazieri is a highly successful Italian screenwriter and bestselling novelist and Kill the Father (transl. Antony Shugaar, out in hardback Feb. 2017, paperback coming out Sept. 2017) promises to be a character-driven, adrenaline rush of a novel set in Rome. There is a slice of Nordic crime as well: new (to me) Swedish author Malin Persson Giolito’s novel Quicksand has been sold to 24 countries and has won the Best Crime Novel of the Year Award in Sweden in 2016.

Luca Veste and Sandrone Dazieri, the two charming Italians.

But it’s not all about well-known authors. S&S is betting on some debut authors as well. For example, former political correspondent Sarah Vaughan has written two previous novels, but Anatomy of a Scandal (out Feb. 2018) marks her crime debut and promises to be a clear-eyed analysis of privilege, power, family and the legal system.  Andrew Taylor’s first novel A Talent for Murder is based on Agatha Christie’s real-life disappearance in 1926 and will be the first of a series featuring Agatha Christie as a sleuth. Husband-and-wife team writing as M. B. Vincent (romance writer Juliet Ashton and her composer husband Matthew) have collaborated before on musicals, but Jess Castle and the Eyeballs of Death is their first foray into crime fiction, described as Midsomer Murders meets feisty young Miss Marple in the West Country.

Amazingly, they are not the only husband-and-wife team to embark upon a new series. R J Bailey’s book Safe from Harm introduces independent, strong female Close Protection Officer (aka bodyguard) Sam Wylde in an international spy thriller – and she is very much the reason why the wife of a writer previously known for historical crime fiction became a co-author.

There are other books too, which I haven’t had a chance to explore in detail: a spy thriller by Alan Judd, a psychological thriller by Sophie McKenzie, a supernatural thriller set in rural Ireland by Mikel Santiago, a police procedural by Lisa Cutts, and a father-and-daughter-being-pursued thriller by Jordan Harper.

Do any of these tempt you or have you read other books by any of the authors mentioned above?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday Fun: Airy and Light Home Libraries

We’ve thrilled and trilled at the attractions of a dark, comforting home library, but there are many lighter, airy-fairyer ones which are just as beautiful.

Who doesn’t want a double-height room to fill with books? From Architecture Art Designs.
The perfect combination of cosiness and light, from freshome.com
Fireplace? Check! Comfy armchair? Check? Lots of wood? Check? But the huge window, transparent landing and minimal curtains make all the difference in this play on a gentleman’s library. From Architecture Art Designs.
White feels a little too stark with books, but it certainly makes it all look clean and tidy. From Decoist.
The perfect living/dining room needs a lot of room for books. After all, they make an excellent topic for conversation. From kemprot.com
A nice compromise between darker libraries and an airy feel – plus, bonus points for the curving staircase. Plenty of room for us to move in with our books, don’t you think?

Can anybody spot what is lacking in most of our homes to allow us to reproduce such magnificence? That’s right: double height ceilings.

 

World Poetry Day – a few spring offerings

A day late is par for the course for me at present. Here are some poetry exercises – 1, 2, 3 and 4 line poems, mainly about Spring as I was driving two years ago to Provence.

1 line poems:

There’s too much beauty in the air.

 

Spring: the waiting is long, but the season is short.

2 line poems:

I cannot name a single bird.

Does that make my spring rush any less real?

 

How can you not let the landscape fill you?

Breathe in, let it tingle your ribs.

 

3 line poems:

Mountains shed their last

snow mantle. I sigh in bliss.

Car behind honks loud.

 

First full day of spring.

Saint Paul les Monestier:

very name a charm.

4 line poems:

Crooked stones with gaps for windows,

sun-baked lizard on ochre tiles,

birds call out their evening greetings

mending headaches, silent sighs.

 

Napoleon may have passed here on his way

to short-lived northern resurrection.

A stream’s the only one bustling today

in domaines of sea-pine covered indolence.

I am also linking this to dVerse Poets Pub for the Open Link Night. Any form or subject goes, so it’s a poetic delight!

Punished for Appearances: Emma Flint’s Little Deaths

Little Deaths by Emma Flint is the kind of book which has been buzzing away on the horizon of my consciousness, with many excited tweets, some excellent reviews and then longlisted for the Bailey’s Prize. I finally read it last week but have been waiting to gather my thoughts about it, because it left me feeling rather spent.

It makes for a powerful reading experience, there is no doubt about that. I went into it not knowing much about the Alice Crimmins case upon which it is based. When I googled it afterwards, I was surprised just how many of the real-life details the author had incorporated into her fictionalised version. Another surprise is that the author has never been to that working-class neighbourhood in Queens in New York (and certainly not in the 1960s). She is in fact British and did most of her research of the setting on YouTube and Google Maps. Kudos to her for such an authentic recreation of time and place.

Ruth Malone is a glamorous red-head, separated from her husband, raising two children whom she loves but often finds hard going, working as a cocktail waitress and being overtly unrestrained in her sexual behaviour, too much so for the tastes of that 1960s neighbourhood (regardless of what people might have got up to behind closed doors). She is also in an acrimonious dispute over custody with her estranged husband Frankie. One morning in July she unlatches her children’s bedroom door to find her young children missing. Within days their bodies are found in a dump and a nearby woods, strangled, decomposed, and she becomes the prime suspect in their deaths.

Cover of Front Page Detective from 1968, featuring Alice Crimmmins.

It soon becomes clear that the police are far more interested in Ruth’s sex life than in proper detective work. They do not seriously search for any other suspects, fail to investigate all the clues and possible avenues, focus only on certain aspects of the evidence (the love letters Ruth has received from her admirers) while ignoring all others. Instead, they interrogate Ruth over and over again, in an attempt to ‘break’ her, which only makes her more angry. In her descriptions of the painfully lonely, eternally disappointed and perpetually defiant Ruth, the author brilliantly encapsulates the attitude of the original Alice Crimmins, who said:  ‘They wanted me to grieve—not for the sake of my children, but for them—the police. I wasn’t going to give them the satisfaction. They were my kids. Nobody was out looking to see who killed my kids. They were interested in making me break.’

The trial was already prejudged by the time they went to court. While Ruth is hardly an angel, she is not too far removed from the frazzled working single mum of today. The gossipy atmosphere, neighbourly resentments, as well as judgemental attitudes towards what makes a good mother are perfectly captured. How dare she take considerable time to put on makeup before talking to detectives or go out to buy a new dress? Never mind that makeup is Ruth’s suit of armour, a defence against acne and possibly some psychological scars. Interestingly enough, many readers’ reviews on Goodreads claim that they cannot feel any grief from Ruth, that she is too emotionally detached, too blank. So she is being judged all over again.

There are some repetitive moments, especially regarding Ruth’s bodily self-loathing and her ‘yellow smell’ – and that lengthy opening scene of putting on her make-up before and after the event which changed her life. [I thought agents and editors warn us to never start with someone looking at themselves in a mirror.] But overall, those poignant moments of enforced gaiety, going out and picking almost any man to combat her loneliness, successfully convey the despair, temporary madness, strange passivity and feeling of futility which do come with immense grief. Every one of us grieves differently.

Of course, we are encouraged to view Ruth in a more positive light because of Pete Wonicke’s growing sympathy towards her. Pete is a rookie journalist who initially contributes to the anti-Ruth rhetoric in an attempt to sensationalise the story and sell newspapers, but increasingly tries to find out the real person behind the mask. Or so he tells himself, in an attempt to justify his obsessive, almost stalkerish fascination with the case. Marking a clever counterpoint to the story, he is a compromised narrator himself.

Author photo from Jo Unwin Literary Agency website.

In this book, Emma Flint offers an alternative explanation for what happened that night, but the real case has never been solved. What made for more disturbing reading is knowing that this type of ‘trial by media and public opinion’ is still so common today. See for example Karen Matthews, often dubbed ‘Britain’s most despised Mum’, or Casey Anthony in the States. a.k.a. ‘America’s most hated’, who declared ‘People found me guilty long before I had my day in court.’ In an age of internet trolling, public reactions are even more frightening and extreme even in relatively mild cases, as in this example of a mother who took an innocent picture of her Down’s syndrome toddler hiding in a washing-machine.

Less of a suspense novel, more of a depiction of a particular era, so perhaps not one for readers who are looking for a true thriller. What it offers instead is both social commentary and an in-depth character study of two lonely misfits: one of whom tries to fit in by making compromises, the other furiously refusing to make any.

 

Old World and New: Louise Penny and Antonin Varenne

More escapist comfort reading, which took me to some very strange places indeed. Quite a contrast in style and subject matter, but both proved to be excellent distractions and got me back into the reading groove again.

Louise Penny: The Beautiful Mystery

I am an unabashed Penny fan, cannot get enough of her delightful, gentlemanly, wise and slightly melancholy Armand Gamache. While I quite enjoy closed room mysteries, I couldn’t help but be sceptical of the audacity of setting this book in a secluded monastery, locked away from the outside world, and with no mention at all of our beloved Three Pines, the idyllic Quebecois village that we all want to live in. But I should trust the author: I have followed her before, moving away from the realm of crime fiction in The Long Way Home, and I have continued to enjoy everything she brings to the table.

As always with the Gamache novels, there is a murder to be solved, as well as a personal vendetta and conspiracy within the Sûreté du Québec. I’ve not read the books in order, so I already knew how things had worked out between Gamache and his faithful sidekick Beauvoir once their corrupt and evil boss Francoeur waggled his serpent’s tongue. That took some of the suspense out of the book, but there is still the mystery of who killed the choir director in the tranquil and long-forgotten community of monks, who have recently become famous because of their amazing recording of Gregorian chants. Comparisons to The Name of the Rose are inevitable, given the setting, but Louise Penny makes this her own, with beautifully rounded characters and sensuous details (those chocolate-covered blueberries!). She turns this very much into a meditation on good and evil, the search for the divine vs. seeking fame, the virtues of silence vs. communicating via words.

As for the reason why I find her books so comforting, the author herself describes it best:

My books are about terror. That brooding terror curled deep down inside us. But more than that, more than murder, more than all the rancid emotions and actions, my books are about goodness. And kindness. About choices. About friendship and belonging. And love. Enduring love.  If you take only one thing away from any of my books I’d like it to be this: Goodness exists.

 

Antonin Varenne: Retribution Road (transl. Sam Taylor)

You will love this book if, like me, you were excited by the premise of the recent BBC TV series Taboo, starring Tom Hardy, but somewhat disappointed by its execution (great build-up, but didn’t go very far and let down by its ending, as is so often the case with a story told over several episodes). A damaged but principled individual returning from a traumatic experience abroad, the East India Company as an out-and-out villain, the dirt and miasma of London and its poorest people, the lure of the New World across the Atlantic – both stories have these elements in common. The book is a chunky 500+ pages, but it’s one of those rollicking adventures of the Alexandre Dumas/ Robert Louis Stevenson type, so it didn’t take long to read.

It’s panoramic, epic and historical crime fiction, three epithets which usually put me off a book, but it really works in this case. A further no-no in my book: it’s about a serial killer, and it spreads over three continents and 11 years. It starts in 1852, with an ill-fated mission in Burma organised by the East India Company. The men are captured and tortured; there are only ten survivors, and they come back more like zombies or ghosts rather than men.

Six years later, one of the survivors, former sergeant Arthur Bowman, works as a policeman in a pestilent, drought-ridden London, and continues to battle his demons in a haze of opium and alcohol. Then he discovers a corpse in a sewer, bearing the same mutilations as they experienced in the jungle, and he becomes convinced the killer is one of the ten men. His mission to discover the killer – who does not stop at one victim, of course – takes him to the New World and ultimately to the Wild West, but above all it’s a journey to find himself.

It takes great courage to combine all these different genres together: adventure story, serial killer thriller, Western and character study, so bravo, Monsieur Varenne for this ambitious tour de force! It has all the breadth and variety of RL Stevenson, the darkness of Joseph Conrad and none of the ‘going off on a tangent’ of Moby Dick.

The book was published on 9th March by MacLehose Press.

#LBF17: Fortunately… Unfortunately…

I don’t often post twice in a day, but am afraid by next week all this will feel sadly out of date. Do you know the children’s storytelling game of ‘Fortunately Unfortunately’ (or at least that’s the name we used in our house)? The first person starts off with a story and after a few sentences ends on a cliffhanger ‘but unfortunately then…’. The next person picks up the baton and carries on for a few more sentences, ending with ‘but fortunately then…’. And so on. One positive for every negative development in the storyline. That’s very much how it felt to me yesterday at the London Book Fair.

Fortunately, I was wearing sensible walking shoes, so I could face the acres of books, stands, events with standing room only, frantic searches for toilets and venues. I’d been advised by the brilliantly-organised Twitter friend Estelle to bring a back-pack and a tote, as well as my own snacks and drinks, so I was able to carry the heavy burden of cultural enlightenment. Unfortunately, I kept losing my map and so missed out on dozens of publishers I was interested in meeting.

What I came away with…

Unfortunately, being a Book Fair novice, I did not make any formal appointments or arrangements beforehand to meet people, especially since I felt I did not want to waste anyone’s time. Fortunately, I got to informally see and hug people I knew from beforehand: Karen Sullivan from Orenda Books and Susan from the wonderful website and blog The Book Trail , literary agent Jo Unwin, author and translator Michelle Bailat Jones , Polish language translator Antonia Lloyd Jones.

Fortunately, as I found out at the conference on Translated Children’s Books, there are some great initiatives in place to make it easier for publishers to take the risk on translated fiction, of which Booktrust’s In Other Words, Reading the Way  and Riveting Reads recommendations for school libraries, and the Hay Festival/Aarhus joint initiative of selecting 39 best European children and YA authors under the age of 40. Unfortunately, when I briefly spoke to writer, translator and cultural agitator Daniel Hahn, who has been involved in most of these initiatives, I realised that it was too late to champion the cause for Romanian literature, as the selections have already been made. Let’s hope that this is not just a one-off project, and there will be updates and potential to develop it further in the future. Although I would agree with Hahn that it would be nice to think that such initiatives will no longer be required in the future, because translation will have become mainstream.

Translated Children’s Literature Panel (from l.): Nicky Harman from Society of Authors, Laura Davies from OutsideIn World,Emma Lidbury from Walker Books, Daniel Hahn.

Fortunately, I got a lot of information and reading suggestions for Malta, Latvia and Lithuania, which were missing on my #EU27Project list. I also found out about possible funding for translation projects from Romanian into English. Unfortunately, I managed to gather so many materials (see above), that the handle on my sturdy tote bag broke.

Unfortunately, the Careers Fair for jobs in publishing was extremely crowded and I felt like I was the donkey among sheep (good old Romanian saying, meaning I was the ‘biggest’, i.e. oldest, one there). Fortunately, the recruitment agencies did not seem to think I was a complete waste of space if I fancied a career change (possibly in academic publishing rather than mainstream fiction).

Fortunately, my day did not end there. I met a friend at the Wellcome Collection and then attended a poetry reading at the Bookmarks bookshop in Bloomsbury. The poets reading from their new collections were American poet Michael Waters , Roy Marshall (whom I knew from his wonderful blog) and Mihaela Moscaliuc, whose debut collection Father Dirt I had absolutely loved. Three very different kinds of poets, with a bouquet of poems at once sad and touching, funny and wry, thoughtful and provocative. I got all three books and look forward to reading them at leisure.

Unfortunately, the poetic evening had to come to an end with a mad dash for the train, crying children all the way home and some forgotten school uniforms to sort out for my sons. Fortunately, I have the memories…