Friday Fun and Another (Long) Break

After my long holiday and blogging break, I will now be taking another break, not sure how long, because of an actual break. For those of you who have not followed my self-pitying saga on Twitter, I fell over last weekend, fractured the elbow and sprained the wrist on the right arm (my writing arm), which has effectively put me out of action for pretty much anything. I can just about do my day job, albeit with speech to text software and frequent breaks, but I never realised how much you need two hands to accomplish simple tasks such as opening a jar of honey, cutting a piece of cheese or putting up your hair. Now that the boys have gone on holiday with their dad, I have no one to help and am beginning to understand why my mother put up with so much from my father over the years, and was so against me getting a divorce, terrified as she is of being alone and infirm in old age. (Needless to say, I still don’t subscribe to that view.)

But this post is called Friday Fun rather than Friday Accident, so on to cheerier things. I have put together some holiday pictures with a literary link.

George Topîrceanu was a Romanian poet and humourist, with family ties to the area where my parents were born and now live. This memorial house in Nămăești, Argeș, was where the poet’s mother lived and ran a weaving workshop.
View from the porch on the upper floor. The poet’s wife and son lived here for a while, and he visited them occasionally, but spend most of his time in Iasi, pursuing his literary activities (and a relationship with the poet Otilia Cazimir).

The Roman poet Ovid was exiled to the Black Sea port of Constanța, known as Tomis in Roman times, and apparently did not have anything complimentary to say about the area. There he is sulking in the main square.

Meanwhile, the Romanian national poet Mihai Eminescu is staring dreamily out to sea, in a sculpture completed in 1934 by the sculptor Oscar Han, through public subscriptions.

Imagine my delight when I discovered that the house where we stayed in Constanța, was the house where an important modernist woman writer Cella Serghi was born and spent most of her childhood. It is right next door to the beautiful Şuțu Villa, which is finally being renovated, as you can see from the tarpaulin covers.

This gives you a little bit of an idea what the Şuțu building used to look like before the scaffolding went up (overlooking the sea, naturally).

This example of a house on stilts from the Danube Delta region reminds me of one of poet George Bacovia’s most famous poems ‘Lacustrine Homes’

Meanwhile, in Bucharest, the Beer Cart (Caru’ cu bere) Pub, brewery and restaurant, with its art nouveau interior, was a much-loved meeting place for literary and artistic figures at the turn of the 20th century.

Finally, who knows, maybe someday they will say: this is the place where the translator and writer Marina Sofia spent her summer holidays as a child?