What Got You Hooked on Crime, Anahita Mody?

I have the pleasure of welcoming Anahita Mody today to talk us through her gradual descent into crime fiction addiction. Anahita is a librarian based in West London, a published poet and an avid reader and reviewer on Goodreads and We Love This Book. She studied English and Creative Writing and freely admits to a bit of an obsession with cossack hats, slipper socks and Keanu Reaves – though not necessarily in that order! Anahita is also very active on Twitter, which is how I had the pleasure of making her acquaintance.

AnahitaHow did you get hooked on crime fiction?

When I was younger I started out reading the Point Crime series and the one that really stood out for me was ‘The Smoking Gun’ by Malcolm Rose. However, I got completely hooked on crime fiction when I was nineteen and at university. I read all of Patricia Cornwell’s Scarpetta series, which I loved. Although I’m not a big fan of her last few novels, I think the rest are spectacular and I love her portrayal of Kay Scarpetta as a strong, independent woman but with quite obvious flaws. Since then I’ve read more and more crime fiction and related sub genres. In fact, I try and focus the majority of my reading on it as it’s become my favourite genre.

Are there any particular types of crime fiction or subgenres that you prefer to read and why?

I’m a big fan of ‘Domestic Noir’ and find it fascinating to read. The idea that a relationship can seem so perfect yet behind closed doors it is the very opposite intrigues. Also, a lot of the time with those novels, the reader isn’t sure whose narrative/side of the story they can believe and trust. 

I also love captivity crime. ‘The Never List’ by Koethi Zan and ‘Still Missing’ by Chevy Stevens are two of the best books I have read this year. I like the writing technique of using flashbacks as I think it really highlights the change in the character to read them in their original voice and then to read them in their post-captivity voice and the way in which the events in the book have changed them.

Finally, I also love psychological thrillers, particularly Gillian Flynn and Samantha Hayes.

AnahitaShelvesWhat is the most memorable book you have read recently?

It would have to be ‘The Girl On The Train’ by Paula Hawkins, a book that is being published in January 2015. The characters are intriguing and I  had no clue as to what the ending could turn out to be. I also loved ‘Daughter’ by Jane Shemilt. The story is such a simple premise but so many twists and turns, plus an ending that stayed with me for a very long time.

If you had to choose only one series or only one author to take with you to a deserted island, whom would you choose?

That’s a tough one! I think it would be Claire McGowan’s Paula Maguire series that is set in Ireland. I love Paula Maguire. She’s my favourite female character: again, because she is a strong woman and the books have so many plot points that the endings really are a shocker. I think Irish fiction is very underrated. There are so many amazing Irish crime writers: Jane Casey, Sinead Crowley and Tana French.

What are you looking forward to reading in the near future?
liarschairI’m looking forward to reading more ‘Domestic Noir’: ‘The Liar’s Chair’ by Rebecca Whitney and also the new ‘Stride’ novel by Brian Freeman. Not forgetting the new novels from Sarah Hilary and Clare Donoghue, which sound fantastic. My TBR pile is about to topple over but I keep adding to it! I love reading British crime and Peter James’ Roy Grace series is one of my favourites. The ongoing story of what happened to Grace’s wife, Sandy, is so intriguing and shows us what Grace was like in the years he was married.
Outside your criminal reading pursuits, what author/series/book/genre do you find yourself regularly recommending to your friends?
I’m a huge shopaholic and I completely relate to the Shopaholic series by Sophie Kinsella. I love her main character, Becky Bloomwood, as she’s a complete contrast to what I normally read. Working in a library, I try to recommend a good variety of books to people and often find myself recommending books that have been turned into films.

I too have a passion for Irish women writers, so it’s good to hear them mentioned here. As always, my TBR list is the biggest victim of this interview series. What do you think of Mel’s choices – have you read any or all of them? She is very up-to-date with the latest releases, isn’t she?

For previous participants in this series, please look here. And please, please, please do not hesitate to let me know if you are passionate about crime fiction of any description and would like to take part. 

Pick of the Month – November Reading

It may not look like it, but November has been another slow month for reading. By November 18th or so, I had only read two books – and both of them had been started in October. But then matters improved.  It occured to me that I have been all over the world this month.   Here are the books I read: with some brief thoughts and/or links to reviews.  The first three have been reviewed (or are about to be reviewed) by me on Crime Fiction Lover.

Bogdan Hrib: Kill the General – a Romanian conspiracy thriller

Sergios Gakas: Ashes – set in Athens just before the Olympic Games 2004

Alan Glynn: Bloodland – set partly in Congo, Ireland and US

Mari Hannah: The Murder Wall – set in party capital of the UK, Newcastle – the first in what promises to be a gripping police procedural series

Lemony Snicket: The Austere Academy – set in the world’s grimmest boarding-school

W. Szymborska: View with a Grain of Sand: Selected Poems – set in Poland and the world; deceptively simple, yet always profound and troubling

Henning Mankell: The Shadow Girls –  set in Sweden and illegal immigrant camps; not a crime novel, an odd combination of tongue-in-cheek description of a writer’s life, and a much more serious description of immigrant life in Sweden

Gillian Flynn: Gone Girl – set in Missouri.

Finally I got to read Gillian Flynn’s much praised book and (unlike last month) I felt the hype was justified.  I will write more about it in a later post, but this was most assuredly my Crime Fiction Pick of the Month (see lovely Kerrie from Mysteries in Paradise about this meme). Not sure about the ending, rather nasty characters, but so cleverly written – I stayed up all night to finish it.