Friday Fun: More Inspirational Workspaces

I’m not naturally a messy person. I am convinced of that. I simply do not have enough clever storage solutions. That must be the reason why I gravitate naturally towards the workspaces of architects, designers and artists. Most of them seem to be supremely tidy (at least when they have their studio photographed) and have plenty of pigeonholes, drawers and other means of tidying things away.

We’ll start off with something simple to warm up, a living room adapted for creativity, from Ina Referencias.
Isn’t that a fantastic creative island – I don’t want an island in the kitchen, I want one for writing, brainstorming, editing and everything else. From mirandaschroeder.com
This feels so calm and peaceful, with the colour coordination. From In Her Studio, Stampington.com
Desks large enough to accommodate computers, tea-trays, books and doodling are a must. From tressemple.com
The home study of the legendary Finnish designer Eero Aarnio from Ignant.com.
And when you get tired of all that work, this cosy small house seems to have a little bit of everything you might need to be happy. From Instagram of Jody Nonnemacher.

Friday Fun: Perfect Workspaces?

I’m not so keen on open plan offices, but I’ve always loved the idea of having an office of my own, with a door I can close, and with lots of beautiful storage space so that I can be freakishly neat (I used to be, once upon a time, not so much now!)

OK, this is an office, but it’s an architects’ studio, and it has a view, so that makes it slightly better than most. From ArchDaily.com
A rather strange all-in-one-desk that can function as a room divider. From In Order to Succeed.
A more minimalist approach, with lots of lighting, both natural and artificial, from YLighting.
A window seat for a bit of a break from work is always a good thing, in my book. From Design Cafe.
Huge windows and lots of plants, as well as the pops of bright colour, make this one very attractive in my eyes. From TheModernHouse.com
Another bright pop of colour to give some zing to a rather bland room with a desk in the middle! Still, that view is a bit OK, isn’t it? From Decorilla.

Friday Fun: More Glamorous Work Spaces

Last week’s home offices were too practical, too efficient. Let’s look at something a little more aspirational this week!

A gallery study in a mountain chalet – you can’t aspire to anything higher than that, right? From Career Contessa.
This is a real design studio for Sarah Sherman, but I would use it just for myself.
This looks like a ship’s captain observation deck, I am a fan of wood panelling at times. From homify.co.uk
This one looks like a painting, especially with the open window. From homestolove.com.au
Corner offices, especially with corner windows, have always been my weakness. From the archives of curbed.com
Perhaps a bit too much glare in this Brussels home office, but it does look rather chic. From Wallpaper.com

Friday Fun: Work is Fun

I think I am trying to convince myself with this title, as I would much rather be on holiday in Yorkshire still. But it certainly would feel a lot more fun if you had one of these home offices – not all of them are ideal and fanciful, but they seem to solve a problem.

Tiny space, no room for a proper desk? Try this creative wavy one on a sort of closed balcony. With the radiator right by your legs, you won’t be as freezing as I get in my study! From Home Adore.
No space and no windows? This is typical of Japanese apartments, but author (and manga/anime artist) Tsukasa Kobayashi has found a great nook to aid his productivity.
Your study has to double as a guestroom/spare bedroom? No problem with this stylish sofa bed, which also makes for really comfy reading. From tuacasa.com.br
Under the eaves? This attic office is more of a hobby room, and could benefit from a few more bookshelves, but it’s a start. From unskinnyboppy.com
Under the eaves and you have to share with others? This long, narrow office sitting on top of an entire house might the solution, from archdaily.com
Under the eaves and you’ve got some historical beams to contend with? This pretty combination of old and new could be the solution, from Anna Wilson Interior Design.
More money than need for a home library or study? Then this dual-aspect corner office might tempt you. From 1stdibs.com

Friday Fun: If I had those home offices…

Working from home has not been as peaceful and productive as many of us imagined it would be while we were cursing our commute, but nevertheless many of us are now hoping that organisations are more open to a hybrid model of working. A couple of days at home every week would really make all the difference – and would certainly be a pleasure in any of the home offices below.

You can’t go wrong with ladders or spiral staircases, as we’ve established. From Wall Street Journal.

Even if you have long, awkwardly shaped rooms… But where do people get all these high ceilings from? From weheartit.com

For those who like it darker, more traditional, this comfy office with reading armchair and window seat has it all. From Pinterest.

But many of you might prefer an office (again, with ceiling height) with a view. It would require a LOT more bookcases, from my point of view, though. From Decoist.

This one has the shelves, but does it have the view? From home-designing.com

This one ticks both boxes: lots of shelves and lots of views! From Decoist.

Friday Fun: Home Offices Galore

Although some (OK, most) of these home offices don’t have nearly enough books stored in them, I could easily remedy that.

You can fit a little desk anywhere… if you have an ornate staircase, like in Elle Decor.
Home office in a garden shed with a porch – yes! From myfavoriteandmybest.com
The one with the view – but perhaps too much glare for a laptop! From Real Simple.
Windows, windows everywhere – perfect for daydreaming, maybe not so good for screen glare. From Fieldstone Homes.
How about books instead of decorative objects on those shelves? But you’ve got to appreciate the window seat. From The Wow Style.
The one with the magnificent view. I’d probably never be able to concentrate enough to get any writing done, from USM Modular.
Truly quirky window treatment but the darker furniture here prevents too much glare, from Skylab.
And if you prefer darker, older colours, check out this townhouse renovation in Brooklyn, from Rock My Style.

Friday Fun: On Not Getting Envious

I’ve barely been using my home office lately. Of course, that has nothing to do with being away or being busy at work and with the children. I’m sure it has everything to do with the decor! So this week I don’t want to get too envious and will show you studies which are Instagrammable but probably not all that comfortable or practical.

Scandi chic but who wants to sit on bar stools all day, from Lundagard.
I actually have that chair (ideal for rocking and reading, not so much for working on the laptop, I think). But where can I get those super-high ceilings and huge windows? From Brainbox.
Sometimes all you need is a looooong desk, and a ladder of course, even if you can reach the top shelves quite easily! From Salon.ru
I could certainly do with a workspace going around two walls of the room (as long as there’s still plenty of room for bookshelves). From Design Sponge.
This one must be Italian – the handbag, the bust, the floor and the uncomfortable chairs lead me to this conclusion. From Pinterest.
Equally elegant, but much more comfortable, but not enough space for books, from Scout for the Home.

Friday Fun: Writerly Places of Interest

Even if some of the people below are not writers, their studies give us an insight into their lives, and above all into the places where creation takes place.

Beryl Bainbridge’s wonderfully eclectic study, from angels to Titanic to stuffed dogs and guns, from AmandaOnWriting.tumblr.com

As you’d expect, Donna Leon is serene in an office reeking of Italian elegance. From El Pais.

Pretty much dream conditions here in Elizabeth Jane Howard’s lived-in study, from The Guardian.

W.S. Maugham also had near-perfect conditions – maybe at his house in France? From BreathingBooks on Tumblr.

A tour of Gabrielle Coco Chanel’s Apartment at 31 Rue Cambone Paris. from Lily Adore Paris.

Peter York, more of a broadcaster and commentator rather than a pure writer, which perhaps explains the up-to-date decor. From The Guardian

This didn’t belong to an actual writer, but is from a marketing brochure for an interior design company. Still, I wouldn’t mind, would you?From Indulgy.com