Summing Up the Decade: Memorable Books

I have no recollection of which books I read in 2010-2011, because I did not keep a record of them on a blog or a spreadsheet. I know I borrowed a lot from the library during that period, so I can’t even look at my shelves and guess from the purchases I made. So my books of the decade will in fact be the books which most stuck in my mind during the past 8 years. To be even more precise: books that I happened to read in the past 8 years, not necessarily books published during this period.

I didn’t have a set number in mind, but have come up with a list of 30, which seems like a nice round number. I did not include rereads in this category, otherwise it might have been skewed in their favour (you reread things for a reason). Not all of them have comprehensive reviews, but I’ve tried to link even the brief ones where possible.

Minae Mizumura: A True Novel

Katherine Boo: Behind the Beautiful Forevers

Joan Didion: The Year of Magical Thinking

Claudia Rankine: Citizen

Sharon Olds: Stag’s Leap

Claire Messud: The Woman Upstairs

Svetlana Alexievich: The Womanly Face of War

Olga Tokarczuk: Flights

Pascal Garnier: How’s the Pain

Jean-Claude Izzo: Marseille Trilogy

Romain Gary: La Promesse de l’aube

Emmanuel Carrere: L’Adversaire

Delphine de Vigan: Nothing Holds Back the Night

Gerhard Jager: All die Nacht uber uns

Jenny Erpenbeck: Gehen ging gegangen

Julia Franck: West

Heather O’Neill: Lullabies for Little Criminals

Javier Marias: A Heart So White

Elena Ferrante: The Days of Abandonment

Mihail Sebastian: Journal

Max Blecher: Scarred Hearts

Tove Jansson: The True Deceiver

Hanne Orstavik: Love

Antti Tuomainen: The Man Who Died

Lauren Beukes: Broken Monsters

John Harvey: Darkness, Darkness

Eva Dolan: Long Way Home

Kathleen Jamie: Sightlines

Denise Mina: Garnethill Trilogy

Chris Whitaker: Tall Oaks

What conclusions might be drawn from the above list? I like rather grim and sad books, clearly, preferably with the words ‘dark’ or ‘night’ in the title. I like world literature: 18 are written in a language other than English, and even the English-speaking authors include a South African, a Canadian and 5 Americans (two Scottish authors – that might count as a distinct category soon). 19 out of 30 are women writers. I much prefer fiction and particularly novels, almost to the exclusion of everything else (only five non-fiction books on this list) Finally, I am attracted to ‘difficult’, controversial subjects – poverty, death, dysfunctional families, social ills, bad physical and mental health, trauma, crime.

So, on that cheery note, here’s to next dystopian decade!