Authors I Discovered This Year – And Want to Read for Years to Come

There are too many new-to-me authors that I’ve discovered this year. They’ve all brought me surprise and joy: it would be unfair to rank them. However, the books on the list below did make me want to seek out everything else their authors have ever written.

Lauren Beukes: Broken Monsters (review to follow shortly)

brokenmonsters

Sebastian Fitzek: Therapy

Therapy

William McIlvanney: Laidlaw

Laidlaw

Jung-Myung Lee: The Investigation

Investigation

Koren Zailckas: Mother, Mother

MotherMother

Claire Messud: The Woman Upstairs

WomanUpstairs

Andrew Solomon: Far From the Tree

FarfromTree

Minae Mizumura: A True Novel

TrueNovel

Miriam Toews: All My Puny Sorrows

AllMyPuny

Ann Patchett: This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage

happymarriage

 

 

 

Reading Bingo for 2014 (Mostly)

Thank you to the wonderful Cleo for making me aware of the reading bingo meme below. She has some wonderful selections on her own blog, do go and check them out, and I doubt I’ll be able to do quite as well, but here goes. I’ve stuck mainly to books read in 2014 and linked to my reviews of them (where available).

reading-bingo-small1) 500+ pages: Pierre Lemaitre’s wonderful recount of the end of the First World War: Au-revoir la-haut

2) Forgotten Classic: Josephine Tey’s Miss Pym Disposes – I hadn’t read it since my schooldays and it was much better this time round

3) Book that became a movie:  Friedrich Dürrenmatt: The Judge and His Hangman – adapted several times for TV and cinema, but its most famous and stylish adaptation is directed by Maximilian Schell

4) Book Published This Year: probably far too many, but one that comes to mind instantly is ‘On ne voyait que le bonheur‘ by Gregoire Delacourt

5) Book with a number in the title: 220 Volts by Joseph Incardona (review still to come) – an ‘electrifying’ account of a marriage in its death throes and a writer searching for inspiration

6) Book written by someone under 30: No idea, as the younger authors don’t usually have a Wikipedia entry with their date of birth, but I suspect that Kerry Hudson might fit into this category. I really enjoyed her novel ‘Thirst’.

7) A book with non-human characters: not really my type of reading, but Lauren Owen’s ‘The Quick’ featured vampires. Does that count? They are humanoid…

8) Funny: Light, witty and making me love my cat even more: Lena Divani’s ‘Seven Lives and One Great Love

9) Book by a female author: LOTS of them, hopefully, but a special shout-out for the delightful Wuthering Heights-like epic by Minae Mizumura ‘A True Novel’

10) Mystery: Well, most of my reading revolves around crime fiction, but I will mention David Jackson’s thrilling, heartbreaking read ‘Cry Baby

11) Novel with a one-word title: Surprisingly, there were a number of contenders for this, but I chose Shuichi Yoshida’s ‘Villain‘ – which is also a single word in Japanese ‘Akunin’.

12) Short stories: I realised this year that I haven’t read many short story collections recently, so I tried to make up for this and read about 4-5. My favourite was Alma Lazarevska’s  ‘Death in the Museum of Modern Art‘, stories set during the siege of Sarajevo.

13) A book set on a different continent: You know how I like to travel, so I have quite a choice here and went for the Solomon Islands in the Pacific Ocean, as portrayed in ‘Devil-Devil’ by Graeme Kent.

14) Non-fiction: Joan Didion’s ‘The Year of Magical Thinking‘ – the most honest and poignant depiction of grief I’ve come across in a long, long time

15) First Book by a favourite author: I’m cheating a little bit here, as I did not read it this year, but ‘The Voyage Out’ by Virginia Woolf surely counts? A much more conventional novel than her later work, it nevertheless contains many of her perennial themes (of trying to fit in, of the difficulties of communication, of allowing your emotions to be your guide and, finally, of becoming your own person with your own thoughts and stimulating intellect).

16) A book I heard about online: I discover many, far too many books and add them to my TBR list as a result of reading so many good blogs. Tony Malone has been the one to blame for many an impulsive purchase (usually well worth the effort!), and now he is also responsible for my obsession with Karl Ove Knausgård and his ‘A Man in Love‘.

17) Bestseller: I’m never quite sure if what I’m reading is a bestseller or not, as this is not one of the criteria I bear in mind when selecting a book. However, I’m pretty sure that ‘Norwegian by Night‘ by Derek B. Miller qualifies for that title – and it won the John Creasey New Blood Dagger Award.

18) Book based on a true story: The partly autobiographical account (supplemented by a lot of imagination and memories from other participants) of the life of her mother by Delphine de Vigan 

19) Book at the bottom of the TBR pile: Well, it depends if it’s electronic book or physical book. I have a massive chunk of double-shelving to get through and the one that happened to be behind all the others was a book I picked up at a library sale ‘Un sentiment plus fort que la peur’ by Marc Levy. Levy is the most-read French author, has been translated into 49 languages and currently lives in the US. I suspect his thrillerish bestsellers might not quite be my style, but at 50 centimes for 400+ pages, I had to see for myself what all the fuss was about.

20) A book that a friend loves: Several friends (both online and real-life) have recommended Claire Messud’s ‘The Woman Upstairs‘. I can completely understand their passion for it.

21) A book that scares me: I don’t read horror fiction very much and am not easily scared. However, horrible situations or characters, such as the mother in Koren Zailckas’ ‘Mother, Mother‘, do give me the creeps.

22) A book that is more than 10 years old: So many of my favourite books are… However, one I recently (re)read was Fumiko Enchi’s ‘The Waiting Years‘, written in 1957, and depicting an even older Japan.

23) The second book in a series: Frédérique Molay’s Paris-based detective Nico Sirsky reappears in the intriguing investigation concerning a dead man’s hidden message in ‘Crossing the Line

LongWayHome24) A book with a blue cover: I am susceptible both to blue covers and to this Canadian writer’s series about Armand Gamache: Louise Penny’s latest novel ‘The Long Way Home

 

May Reading/ Halfway Through the Year

farfromtreeThis is a post to wrap up not only my reading for May, but also a half year’s worth of reading. I am happy to report that I’m just over halfway through my Goodreads reading challenge of 150 books for 2014, so this might be a good point to take stock of which books have really astounded or delighted me thus far.

First, the May summary. It’s been a month of very diverse reading and 6 out of 15 have been foreign books.

3 Non-Fiction:

The brilliant ‘Far from the Tree‘ by Andrew Solomon, the puzzling ‘The Fly Trap‘ by Fredrik Sjoberg and the riotous memoir of the 70s and feminism by Michele Roberts ‘Paper Houses’. I have really found a kindred spirit in Michele Roberts and hugely admire her courage and sacrifices in order to focus so single-mindedly on her writing.

1 Poetry Collection:

Father Dirt‘ by Mihaela Moscaliuc – Hard-hitting and heart-breaking

5 Crime Fiction or Thriller:

ColdStealSpy thriller by Stella Rimington ‘The Geneva Trap‘, the short story anthology ‘In a Word, Murder’, ‘Cold Steal‘ by Quentin Bates, the domestic psychological drama of ‘All the Things You Are’ by Declan Hughes and the unputdownable ‘Cry Baby’ by David Jackson.

6 Other Genres:

Frothy satire of writing courses ‘Writing Is Easy‘ by Gert Loveday

Long-winded and ominous, but not as illuminating as a real Greek tragedy ‘The Secret History‘ by Donna Tartt

Satire that seems even more apt and sinister in the wake of the European elections ‘Er ist wieder da’ (Look Who’s Back) by Timur Vermes

Painful depiction of the breakdown of a toxic marriage ‘Une affaire conjugale‘ by Eliette Abecassis

A family saga of post-war Japan – a reinterpretation of Wuthering Heights for the modern world ‘A True Novel‘ by Minae Mizumura

A graphic novel with a rather similar theme of family secrets and growing up in post-war Japan ‘A Distant Neighbourhood’ by Jiro Taniguchi

CryBabyMy favourites this month? ‘Cry Baby’ in crime fiction, because I found it impossible to stop myself from reading it all the way to the end. A rarer quality than one might suppose, even in thrillers. This links to the Crime Fiction Pick of the Month meme hosted at Mysteries in Paradise.

And, at the opposite end of the spectrum, the stately pace and melancholy of ‘A True Novel’. [I am not including the non-fiction or poetry here, but they deserve a special mention, for they were all outstanding.]

Now for the half-year round-up. I’ve read 79 books this year (yeah, it’s been a slow couple of months at work, so I’ve had more time for reading). If I’ve added up all the numbers correctly, here is the balance of the year so far (some books fit in more than one category, so the totals won’t make sense).

Japanese edition of Volume 2 of A True Novel.
Japanese edition of Volume 2 of A True Novel.

8 books in French, 3 in German and 19 translations – so 38% of my reading has been foreign. Surprising result, I expected it to be much more! Curious to see if this changes by the end of the year. I’m very pleased I managed to stick to my plan of reading at least one book per month in French, though (since I am living in France and need to improve my French).

43 books have been of the crime fiction and thriller persuasion, so about 54% of my reading. This is less than last year, although I have continued reviewing crime for Crime Fiction Lover website. I have also read 5 poetry books, so about one a month, which is essential (and the absolute minimum) for a working poet. I have also read 9 non-fiction books (11%) – one of the highest proportions in a long while. So it would be fair to say that my reading has broadened this year, quite deliberately.

InvestigationAnd which books have truly captured my imagination thus far? I have liked, even loved quite a few of them. I was struck by the almost visceral power of ‘Mother Mother’ by Koren Zailckas and Claire Messud’s ‘The Woman Upstairs’, fell under the spell of William McIlvanney’s prose and Mahmoud Darwish’s or Brenda Shaughnessy’s poetry. But the five books that really stayed with me are:

Jung-Myung Lee: The Investigation – neither crime nor prison saga, but a tale of the triumph of beauty over despair

Pierre Lemaitre: Au revoir la-haut – moving portrayal of the harshness of post-war society

Minae Mizumura: A True Novel – perhaps because this book encapsulates my love affair with Japan

Mihaela Moscaliuc’s debut poetry collection: Father Dirt – because it’s part of me and gives me power to explore more in my own poems

Andrew Solomon: Far from the Tree – a book that had me thinking and talking about it for days and weeks afterwards, which forever changed certain of my ideas

 

 

 

 

 

Are Modern Books Too Long?

You may have noticed that books have become longer in the last few years. Fellow crime fiction connoisseur Margot Kinberg recently did a strawpoll of crime novels and found that since 2000 more and more of them fall in the 300+ pages category. Others have noticed the reappareance of ‘chunksters’ across all genres – and they seem to be walking away with quite a few literary prizes too (The Luminaries, Wolf Hall, Au-revoir là-haut, The Goldfinch). Does that fly in the face of the much-vaunted evidence that our attention spans are getting shorter and that we spend far too much time online? Are people perhaps reading fewer books per year, but then committing more time to the ones that they do buy and read? I’ve read four doorstoppers this month. Well, we had 2 weeks of rainy school holidays, so I couldn’t get much else done. Plus I’ve had no Internet/phone/TV for the last day and a half (that’s what happens when everything is tied up in a single provider), so there was nothing I could do but read. I’ve already given my unvarnished opinion of ‘The Secret History’, but the other three chunky books never felt too long. Because I am so far behind on my reviews, I will discuss all three of them in this post, but they each deserve a far more detailed review.

farfromtreeAndrew Solomon: Far from the Tree

We’ve all done it as parents: wondered ‘where on earth does my child get that from?’ or ‘what changeling has been put into my cradle?’  Some families go far beyond that: they have children who are exceptional in all sorts of ways – they may be dafe or autistic or  child prodigies, they may be severely disabled or dwarfs or trapped in the wrong kind of gender. They may be difficult to love, like children who are the result of rape, or who are schizophrenic and violent, or who turn to crime.  There is a chapter for each of these situations in this monumental non-fiction book, a labour of love arising from Solomon’s own experience of clashes with his parents about being gay, and based on 10 years of interviews with families all over the United States. About a third of the book are footnotes and references, so it’s not quite as long as it looks, but I could not get my fill of all the personal stories shared here. It is well-documented, yet very readable, because it is all about real people and their very moving, often very difficult stories. Let me give you just one example. After meeting the Klebold family, whose son Dylan was one of the teenagers responsible for the Columbine High School killings, the author says:

The better I came to know the Klebolds, the more deeply mystified I became. Sue Klebold’s kindness would be the answered prayer of many a neglected or abused child, and Tom’s bullish enthusiasm would lift anyone’s tired spirits. Among the many families I’ve met in writing this book, the Klebolds are among those I would be most game to join.

And this is what I love about the book – it doesn’t preach or give solutions. It admits bafflement when confronted with human behaviour and with the enduring power of love.

I’ve heard some criticism that the research is not quite so thorough in parts, that the author sides with one school of thought or another (for instance, there is quite a bit of conflict within the deaf-mute community whether signing or learning spoken language is the way to go, or within the dwarf community whether limb-lengthening is an acceptable surgical procedure). Yet for a reader like me who is new to most of these conditions, it was an eye-opening introduction. It is a popular science book, but one brimming over with emotions and lovely quotes. It will open up your mind and heart, and will make you question your own tolerance of difference and your own power of acceptance. My favourite non-fiction book of the year, no question!

HitlerTimur Vermes: Er ist wieder da  (translated as ‘Look Who’s Back’ & published by MacLehose Press).

The instant I saw that sober black and white cover with the proverbial moustache, I was intrigued. This is actually the shortest of my chunksters: about 400 pages in the original German hardback, and I think it’s just about the perfect length. Too short and it would have been superficial, longer and the satire would have started to feel tired and overblown. As it is, it’s a very funny book, and you keep reading on to see just how far the author will go with his conceit.

Just imagine that Hitler had not died in his bunker in 1945, but had instead gone into some kind of cryogenic coma and woken up in 2011. How would he cope with present-day society? Surprisingly well. In this hard-hitting satire and rather brave book, the author can be quite savage in his criticism of many of the political and social trends in today’s Germany, including day-time television, the cult of celebrities, personal branding, party in-fighting and well-meaning liberalism. Of course, this is perhaps a more humane and less obsessive fictional Hitler, but the implications are chilling. Especially when he agrees (or you agree) with many of the things being said about the euro, certain EU countries needing to pull their weight, rampant consumerism and paying lip-service to ecology.

truenovelMinae Mizumura: A True Novel

To say this is ‘Wuthering Heights’ transposed into a Japanese landscape is not quite doing the book full justice. The story is, indeed, very closely based on the characters, the plot and even the narrative devices (story within a story) of the original, but there are many other influences at work here too.  Tanizaki’s ‘The Makioka Sisters’, ‘The Great Gatsby’, Dazai Osamu’s ‘The Setting Sun, and Chekhov’s ‘The Cherry Orchard’ are all invoked here, whether directly or not.
The leisurely pace and many digressions bring to mind a Russian or Victorian novel (unlike the brevity of the original Brontë novel), and there may be a little bit of sagging in the middle. The story within a story can feel a bit artificial at times (I was puzzled why there was an additional layer beyond the Lockwood/Nelly equivalent), but it does provide us with even more questions about whose account of events we can trust, just how reliable each narrator is, or just how much we can know of the truth. Above all, I enjoyed the sense of place: the faded beauty of a resort like Karuizawa, the spookiness of the foggy lake, pampas grass and abandoned cottages, in contrast with the onslaught of modern developments and tourists.

Traditional Western villa, Karuizawa, from gonagano.net
Traditional Western villa, Karuizawa, from gonagano.net

It’s this contrast between old and new, between tradition and modernity, between affluence and poverty, which makes this much more of a social fresco than the original work. This is also a panorama of post-war Japan, the initial crushing defeat, followed by the Japanese economic miracle, and then the burst of the bubble and the lost decade of stagnation (just one decade at the time the book was written). There is also quite a bit in the prologue about the perception of Japanese people in the United States and the often troubled relationship between the two countries.

Impeccably translated from Japanese by Juliet Winters Carpenter (and believe me, it is not easy to convey Fumiko’s quaint, old-fashioned style of speaking in English) and presented in a beautiful 2 volume box set with atmospheric pictures of the locations, this edition is a work of art. I am still floating in the world created by the author, because, of course, we all dream of a Heathcliff and of a love that defies all conventions.