Sunday Showcase: My Not Quite So Abstinent Haul of Books

I refuse to preface each week’s post with ‘I know I said I would buy no more books but…’. No apologies! It’s my money and I’ll spend it all on books and go bankrupt if I want to. (Besides, I know where my boys’ piggy banks are…)

BookhaulSept19

Bought

So yes, I did splurge on the Manchette collection of noir novels (in French). With that and the Simenon romans dur, I do believe I am sorted for reading in French until about 2020.

I also bought the first two BD in the excellent Cellule Poison series by Laurent Astier – set in the Europol centre in Lyon, so pretty much local.

I’m always keen to read more poetry and support poets by buying their books (anybody feeling sorry for authors in general should stop and consider how much money poets make from selling their books). So I bought Maggie Hannan’s debut collection ‘Liar, Jones’ – I have heard good things about her brave, experimental exploration of feminine sensibilities and experience.

Sent for Review

Also shown in the picture: I got sent a book to review by the Oxford University Press: Hester Vaizey’s ‘Born in the GDR: Living in the Shadow of the Wall’. It talks about the changes the fall of the Berlin Wall brought into the lives of eight formerly East German citizens. One of my best friends is a born and bred East Berliner, so I was curious to see how her experience compares to that of Vaizey’s interviewees. Besides, I come from a former Communist state myself and it’s fascinating to see how those vanished (and once much hated) political states are remembered (often nostalgically) 25 years after.

Library

I am so overdue on some of my library books (because more pressing reads get in the way) that I think my membership will be revoked. However, I still managed to sneak out an additional book, namely Joan Smith: What Men Say.  Smith is a writer,journalist and human rights activist. Her Loretta Lawson novels were popular in the early 1990s (when I first moved to Britain) as a crime fiction writer with a feminist bent, but they seem to have fallen into oblivion since. I look forward to reading (or rereading – I can’t remember which of the 5 books I’ve already read) and seeing if I feel the same about them now as an older (but possibly not wiser) feminist.

Addendum

I had just written all of the above, when the postman rang the doorbell and delivered another beautiful round of parcels. Is there anything better than receiving books? It’s like Christmas every week! Here is the additional haul (apologies for the poor lighting conditions):

BookHaul2

Technically speaking, not mine at all! I just ordered them for the children, so it surely doesn’t count. Did you read any of these when you were a child, or are you reading them to your children now? Aren’t they brilliant? I sometimes think children’s literature is better than literature for adults.

 

Showcase Sunday: Book Haul This Week

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Showcase Sunday is a weekly meme hosted by omnivorous book blogger Vicky at Books, Biscuits and Tea. The aim of this event is to showcase the latest precious hoard of books we received for review, borrowed from libraries, bought in bookshops and downloaded onto eReaders this week. It’s fun to see what others are reading (or adding to their TBR pile). 

It’s been a meagre week of book buying or borrowing, as I’ve only just got back from my business travels.

I found one book waiting for me, to be reviewed for the Crime Fiction Lover website.

InnocentTaylor Stevens: The Innocent

From the blurb: Eight years ago, a man walked five-year-old Hannah out the front doors of her school and spirited her over the Mexican border, taking her into the world of a cult known as The Chosen. For eight years, followers of The Prophet have hidden the child, moving her from country to country, shielding the man who stole her. Now, those who’ve searched the longest know where to find her. They are childhood survivors of The Chosen, thirty-somethings born and raised inside the cult who’ve managed to make lives for themselves on the outside. They understand the mindset, the culture within that world, and turn to Vanessa Michael Munroe for help, knowing that the only possibility of stealing Hannah back and getting her safely out of Argentina is to trust someone who doesn’t trust them, and get Munroe on the inside.

And I bought one book for my e-reader. As an expat in France, I just couldn’t resist this delicious and hopefully humorous concoction:

LamourMelanie Jones: L’Amour Actually

From the blurb: After one particularly bad day at work, marketing executive and confirmed city girl Melanie Jones decides to give up her old life in search of something new and simpler in South West France. With little knowledge of the country, even less of the language and just the memory of a disastrous school French exchange and a few day trips to Calais, she embarks on her adventure with a suitcase full of optimism and not a little bit of naivety. After all, how different can life in France be?

 

Showcase Sunday: Book Haul

Showcase Sunday is a weekly meme hosted by omnivorous book blogger Vicky at  Books, Biscuits and Tea. The aim of this event is to showcase the latest precious hoard of books we received for review, borrowed from libraries, bought in bookshops and downloaded onto eReaders this week. It’s fun to see what others are reading (or adding to their TBR pile) as well. 

While I’ve been away on business (and am about to set off again, after just 24 hours spent at home), I’ve not had the pleasure of following many of the recommended reads, nor have I ordered anything online. Good for my wallet, less good for my morale. Luckily, when I came home, a few postal deliveries were waiting for me. I can’t wait to get back home and start reading them properly!

 

AITO_CoverSummer Piere: The Artist in the Office

How to creatively survive and thrive seven days a week –  no need to tell you why I might need this book, particularly this month!

This is a humorous approach to a serious problem – and apparently also includes some serious tips, as well as fun suggestions and illustrations.

 

Naomi

 

Naomi Shihab Nye: Tender Spot (Selected Poems)

The poet who inspired me to start poetry again after a 20 year hiatus. Her poems are witty, tender, fiesty and truly global. And just look at the gorgeous blue cover!

 

 

 

 

silentmusicAdam Wyeth: Silent Music –  the debut poetry collection by an English-language poet who has settled in West Cork, in Ireland. A strong, original, quirky voice  that I am curious to find out more about, especially since Adam is my tutor on my long-distance poetry course (which I have sadly neglected for the past 2-3 weeks).